Tag Archives: Corsican language

Further reflexions on the status of “I love you” in Corsican language

Let us briefly recall the problem: translating ‘I love you’ might sound trivial, but it’s not. In fact, ‘ti amu‘ is not the best translation. The best translation is ‘ti tengu caru‘ when addressed to a male person, or ‘ti … Continue reading

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A specific kind of superlative

Let us consider a specific kind of superlative. Such form specific to Corsican language is notably mentioned by grammarian and author Santu Casta, in his  Punteghju, who recommends the following translation of “C’était le village le plus riche du canton” (It was … Continue reading

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Anagrams in Corsican language

Here are some anagrams in Corsican language: Corscia è Corsica Marta è Matra accanitu è uccitana acciliratu, ricciulata è riciculata accirtà è traccià accirtatu, catarticu è tracciatu adriatica è cadariati anacrunisimu è cunsumariani aprarà è pararà arba è bara attaccu … Continue reading

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Rough typology of remaining errors (updated march 2018)

French to Corsican: performing on French wikipedia sample test currently amounts to 94% on average. Below is a rough typology of remaining errors (presumably an average scoring of 95% on the open test should be attainable on the basis of correction … Continue reading

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A Special Case of Anaphora Resolution

Anaphora resolution usually refers to pronouns. But we face here a special case of anaphora resolution that relates to an adjective. The following sentence: ‘un vase de Chine authentique’ (an authentic vase of China) is translated erroneously as un vasu … Continue reading

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Solving fivefold ambiguity: translation for French ‘poste’

French word ‘poste’ has (at least) fivefold ambiguity. For it can designate: ‘poste’ (masculine singular noun) : postu, masculine singular noun (set, i.e. television set) ‘poste’ (masculine singular noun): posta, feminine singular noun (position): erroneously translated as postu in the present case … Continue reading

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Unexpected pitfalls in the disambiguation of some expressions

Some unexpected pitfalls are lurking in the process of disambiguation of some expressions or locutions. In the above example, the French locution ‘en train de’ can be translated : either into in trenu da (by train from) or into in … Continue reading

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Chemistry: translating acid names

Translating this series of acid names is not as easy as it could seem at first glance. In effect, each acid name is composed of three consecutive ambiguous names: ‘l’ is ambiguous between the masculine (u, the) or feminine (a, … Continue reading

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Interesting case of first name disambiguation

Here is an interesting case of first name disambiguation for machine translation. Consider the following first name ‘Camille’. It can apply to both genders. In Corsican (taravese or sartinese variants) it translates either into Cameddu (masculine) or Camedda (feminine). In … Continue reading

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Writing differences between Corsican and Gallurese

Here are some writing differences between Corsican and Sardinian gallurese, that result from historical writing habits. These writing differences prevail, even when the words are the same: ghj is replaced by gghj: acciaghju (corsu), acciagghju (gallurese) , steel chj is … Continue reading

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How rule-based and statistical machine translation can help each other

Here are a few suggestions on how rule-based and statistical machine translation  can help each other: (This is a follow-up to the previous post) to begin with, rule-based and statistical machine translation are often contrasted and compared: it would be … Continue reading

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A first 100%!

Now scoring 1 – 0/124 = 100%. Translated into Corsican ‘sartinesu’. Another Feigenbaum hit.

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French ‘fin’ followed by a year number: fixed

Tagger improvement: fixed this issue. French ‘l’Empire allemand’ now translates properly into l’Imperu alimanu (the German Empire). French word ‘fin’ is now identified as a preposition when followed by a year number. The above excerpt is translated into the ‘sartinesu’ … Continue reading

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Translation of preposition ‘à’ followed by noun phrase denoting a location

‘au stade de Wembley’ (at the Wembley Stadium) should translate in u stadiu di Wembley. We face the issue of the translation of preposition ‘à’ since ‘au’ is short for ‘à le’ (to the), in particular when ‘à’ is followed … Continue reading

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Accordance of past participe

Now scoring 1 – 2/129 = 98.44%. The issue of past participe’s accordance again: ‘une session du parlement tenue à Nuremberg’ (a session of the Parliament held in Nuremberg) should translate into una sessione di u parlamentu tenuta in Nuremberg. … Continue reading

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Past participe or present simple: the disambiguation of French ‘construit’

In the present case, it should read, custruitu à u seculu XII (built in the 12th century). The error relates to the disambiguation of French ‘construit’. It can translate into: custruitu (built): past participe, masculine, singular custruisce (builds): present simple, … Continue reading

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The disambiguation of French ‘fils’ again: scoring 98.42%

Scoring 1 – 2/127 = 98.42%. Of interest: ‘de 839 à sa mort’ (from 839 to his death) should read: da u 839 à a so morte. French ‘de’ translates either into di or into da in Corsican language (to … Continue reading

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Can translation help teaching an endangered language?

Can translation help self-teaching and endangered language? It seems yes, it the translation is accurate. Let us check with the verb parlà (to speak). In this case, the translation is 100% accurate, so it can help (but we need to … Continue reading

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