Author Archives: pilinu

How to translate ‘Cette phrase est en français’ ? (This sentence is in French) – updated

Let us consider the following French sentence: Le comté de Kronoberg est un comté suédois dont le nom signifie en français ‘Couronne de montagne’. It translates into Corsican: A cuntea di Kronoberg hè una cuntea svedese chì u so nome significheghja in … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on How to translate ‘Cette phrase est en français’ ? (This sentence is in French) – updated

Superintelligent machine translation (updated)

Let us consider superintelligence with regard to machine translation. To fix ideas, we can propose a rough definition: it consists of a machine with the ability to translate with 99% (or above) accuracy from one of the 8000 languages to … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Superintelligent machine translation (updated)

Brain Emulation

What is it to make a rule-based translation software for a given language pair? It amounts to making part of Brain Emulation, dedicated to translating one language into another i.e. emulating the brain of a bilingual individual. Arguably, ‘human cognition emulation’ is … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Rough typology of remaining errors (updated march 2018)

French to Corsican: performing on French wikipedia sample test currently amounts to 94% on average. Below is a rough typology of remaining errors (presumably an average scoring of 95% on the open test should be attainable on the basis of correction … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

What are the conditions for a given endangered language to be a candidate for rule-based machine translation?

What are the conditions for a given endangered language to be a candidate for rule-based machine translation? For a given endangered language to be a candidate for rule-based machine translation, some requirements are in order. There is notably need for: a … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on What are the conditions for a given endangered language to be a candidate for rule-based machine translation?

Interesting case of first name disambiguation

Here is an interesting case of first name disambiguation for machine translation. Consider the following first name ‘Camille’. It can apply to both genders. In Corsican (taravese or sartinese variants) it translates either into Cameddu (masculine) or Camedda (feminine). In … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing differences between Corsican and Gallurese

Here are some writing differences between Corsican and Sardinian gallurese, that result from historical writing habits. These writing differences prevail, even when the words are the same: ghj is replaced by gghj: acciaghju (corsu), acciagghju (gallurese) , steel chj is … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Writing differences between Corsican and Gallurese

Quandu da la forza à la raghjoni cuntrasta Tandu vinci la forza è la raghjoni ùn basta

Quandu da la forza à la raghjoni cuntrasta Tandu vinci la forza è la raghjoni ùn basta. This is a rare Corsican proverb. In French, litterally: “Lorsque la force et la raison s’opposent, alors la force gagne car la raison … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How rule-based and statistical machine translation can help each other

Here are a few suggestions on how rule-based and statistical machine translation  can help each other: (This is a follow-up to the previous post) to begin with, rule-based and statistical machine translation are often contrasted and compared: it would be … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Why rule-based translation is (presently) best suited to endangered languages

Here are some arguments in favor of the choice of rule-based translation concerning machine translation of endangered languages (it relates to the philosophy of language policy): there does not exist at present time a reliable corpus between the given endangered … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Enhancing French to Italian translation

Some improvements made to French to Italian translation: fixed several contractors (della, dello, …) the nice thing is that semantic disambiguation is working: ‘échecs’ = fallimenti/scacchi (failures/chess) and translates properly into scacchi

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Very first draft on French to Italian

Now testing French to Italian translation: it is the very first draft. A rough 80%. A lot of things to fix.

Posted in blog | Leave a comment

Improvement in grammatical structures: another 100% hit

Progress on grammatical structures: some improvements to be included in future 1.2 version yield another Feigenbaum hit: 100%. In the present case, the Corsican language variety is taravese.  

Posted in blog | Comments Off on Improvement in grammatical structures: another 100% hit

Percentage of ambiguous words in French sentence (from French to Corsican translation perspective)

What is the average percentage of ambiguous words in a French sentence (from a French to Corsican translation perspective). In the above example, this percentage amounts to 20/99 words = approximately 20%. Not all semantic ambiguities are taken into account here, so … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Comments Off on Percentage of ambiguous words in French sentence (from French to Corsican translation perspective)

Disambiguation of two consecutive ambiguous words: ‘plusieurs mois’

Testing improved disambiguation engine. This is a special case of disambiguation of two consecutive ambiguous words. French ‘au terme de plusieurs mois’ translates into à u capu di parechji mesa (at the end of several months) in Corsican (taravese variant). … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Comments Off on Disambiguation of two consecutive ambiguous words: ‘plusieurs mois’

Disambiguation of ‘vie’

We face here a special case of disambiguation: ‘un général byzantin du vie siècle’ (a Byzantine general of the sixth century) should translate: un generali bizantinu di u 6esimu seculu. French ‘vie’ is ambiguous between vita and 6esimu or VIesimu (life/sixth). In … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Comments Off on Disambiguation of ‘vie’

Gender reversal: masculine to feminine

Here is a series of words that are masculine in French and feminine in Corsican language (taravese variant).

Posted in blog | Comments Off on Gender reversal: masculine to feminine

Gender reversal: feminine to masculine

French to Corsican (taravese variant): here is a list of words that are changing from feminine to masculine.

Posted in blog | Comments Off on Gender reversal: feminine to masculine

French to English: handling adjective order

Now beginning to handle adjective order in French to English translation: ‘un peintre russe juif’: un pittori russiu ghjudeiu (a Russian Jewish painter)

Posted in blog | Comments Off on French to English: handling adjective order

Word-sense disambiguation: first test of new engine

Now testing the new engine with the semantically ambiguous French ‘échecs’ = fiaschi/scacchi (failures/chess). What is interesting here is that semantic disambiguation transfers successfully into English (although the French/English engine is still in its infancy as there are still a … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Word-sense disambiguation: first test of new engine

Feigenbaum test and semantic disambiguation

Now it is patent that there cannot be successful  Feigenbaum test (i.e. not only occasional Feigenbaum hits, but regular and average performance) without an adequate treatment of semantic disambiguation. Arguably, it is one hard problem of machine translation. Here are some … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Feigenbaum test and semantic disambiguation

French to English: superlative

Now testing French to English translation. Still a lot of grammatical errors. The scoring is a rough 80%. Adjective-noun order is now handled properly. But some progress in superlative is expected: ‘le plus important’ should translate: the most important ‘le plus … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Comments Off on French to English: superlative

Adjective-noun reversal in English

Now beginning to incrementally improve the translation from French to English. Beginning with adjective order in noun + adjective structures: ‘présence significative’ = significant presence ‘soldats coloniaux’ = colonial soldiers ‘colonies françaises’ = French colonies

Posted in blog | Comments Off on Adjective-noun reversal in English

A first 100%!

Now scoring 1 – 0/124 = 100%. Translated into Corsican ‘sartinesu’. Another Feigenbaum hit.

Posted in blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Disambiguation of fourfold ambiguous French ‘pygmée’

Translation in the ‘sartinesa’ variant of the Corsican language. Scoring 1 – (1/110) = 99.09%. Let us focus on the disambiguation of fourfold ambiguous French ‘pygmée’. A rare case of ambiguity between masculine/feminine singular. It can consist of: masculine singular noun: translates … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Comments Off on Disambiguation of fourfold ambiguous French ‘pygmée’

French to English: first experimental test

Now testing the translation from French to English. A lot of grammatical errors (a rough 75%). To mention but a few of them: adjective + noun inversion: localities Alsatian should read: Alsatian localities date format inversion: 4 March should read: March … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Translating French into the ‘sartinesu’ variant of Corsican language

Translating French into the ‘sartinesu’ variant of Corsican language: scoring 1 – (1/105) = 99.04%. Feigenbum hit? Yes: ‘médailleur’ is not common word.

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

French ‘fin’ followed by a year number: fixed

Tagger improvement: fixed this issue. French ‘l’Empire allemand’ now translates properly into l’Imperu alimanu (the German Empire). French word ‘fin’ is now identified as a preposition when followed by a year number. The above excerpt is translated into the ‘sartinesu’ … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on French ‘fin’ followed by a year number: fixed

French ‘fin’ followed by a year number

There is one informative error here: ‘a agité l’Empire allemand fin 1913’ (agitated the German Empire at the end of 1913) should translate into chì hà agitatu l’Imperu alimanu à a fini di u 1913. The translation error (l’Imperu alimana … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Comments Off on French ‘fin’ followed by a year number

Object of the verb ‘to exist’

French ‘il existe 29 parcs nationaux’ (there are 29 national parks) translates into Corsican: esistenu 29 parchi naziunali. When the verb ‘to exist’ is used and its object is plural, a plural form of the verb is required in Corsican … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Comments Off on Object of the verb ‘to exist’