Tag Archives: disambiguation

Four consecutive ambiguous words

Translating the following sentence: ‘ce fait est unique’ is not as easy as it could seem at first glance. In effect, it is made up of four consecutive ambiguous words: ‘ce’: ‘ssu (demonstrative pronoun, this) or ciò (it, relative pronoun) … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Solving fivefold ambiguity: translation for French ‘poste’

French word ‘poste’ has (at least) fivefold ambiguity. For it can designate: ‘poste’ (masculine singular noun) : postu, masculine singular noun (set, i.e. television set) ‘poste’ (masculine singular noun): posta, feminine singular noun (position): erroneously translated as postu in the present case … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Unexpected pitfalls in the disambiguation of some expressions

Some unexpected pitfalls are lurking in the process of disambiguation of some expressions or locutions. In the above example, the French locution ‘en train de’ can be translated : either into in trenu da (by train from) or into in … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Chemistry: translating acid names

Translating this series of acid names is not as easy as it could seem at first glance. In effect, each acid name is composed of three consecutive ambiguous names: ‘l’ is ambiguous between the masculine (u, the) or feminine (a, … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Another case of firstname ambiguity: ‘Noël’

Translation of the French word ‘Noël’ yields another case of ambiguity. For ‘Noël’ can translate: either into Natali (Christmas, Christmas Day): the annual festival commemorating Jesus Christ’s birth or into, identically, Natali (‘Noel‘): the firstname Now it seems there is no case of … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Interesting case of first name disambiguation

Here is an interesting case of first name disambiguation for machine translation. Consider the following first name ‘Camille’. It can apply to both genders. In Corsican (taravese or sartinese variants) it translates either into Cameddu (masculine) or Camedda (feminine). In … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Word-sense disambiguation: first test of new engine

Now testing the new engine with the semantically ambiguous French ‘échecs’ = fiaschi/scacchi (failures/chess). What is interesting here is that semantic disambiguation transfers successfully into English (although the French/English engine is still in its infancy as there are still a … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on Word-sense disambiguation: first test of new engine

Feigenbaum test and semantic disambiguation

Now it is patent that there cannot be successful  Feigenbaum test (i.e. not only occasional Feigenbaum hits, but regular and average performance) without an adequate treatment of semantic disambiguation. Arguably, it is one hard problem of machine translation. Here are some … Continue reading

Posted in blog | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Feigenbaum test and semantic disambiguation