Tag Archives: Corsican language

Chemistry: translating acid names

Translating this series of acid names is not as easy as it could seem at first glance. In effect, each acid name is composed of three consecutive ambiguous names: ‘l’ is ambiguous between the masculine (u, the) or feminine (a, … Continue reading

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Interesting case of first name disambiguation

Here is an interesting case of first name disambiguation for machine translation. Consider the following first name ‘Camille’. It can apply to both genders. In Corsican (taravese or sartinese variants) it translates either into Cameddu (masculine) or Camedda (feminine). In … Continue reading

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Writing differences between Corsican and Gallurese

Here are some writing differences between Corsican and Sardinian gallurese, that result from historical writing habits. These writing differences prevail, even when the words are the same: ghj is replaced by gghj: acciaghju (corsu), acciagghju (gallurese) , steel chj is … Continue reading

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How rule-based and statistical machine translation can help each other

Here are a few suggestions on how rule-based and statistical machine translation  can help each other: (This is a follow-up to the previous post) to begin with, rule-based and statistical machine translation are often contrasted and compared: it would be … Continue reading

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A first 100%!

Now scoring 1 – 0/124 = 100%. Translated into Corsican ‘sartinesu’. Another Feigenbaum hit.

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