More on grammatical type disambiguation

Let us focus on grammatical type disambiguation, which is a subproblem of word disambiguation. General grammatical types are: verbs, nouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, gerundive, etc. But for grammatical type disambiguation purposes, more accuracy is in order: instances of grammatical types are then: masculine singular noun, feminine singular noun, masculine plural noun, feminine plural noun, masculine singular adjective, feminine singular adjective, masculine plural adjective, feminine plural adjective, adverbs, prepositions, gerundive, etc. Now grammatical type disambiguation can occur between two different grammatical types (in the above-mentioned form). For example, an ambiguity can occur between preposition and gerundive. In French, this is notably the case for ‘devant’ and ‘maintenant’. For ‘devant’ can either be an adverb (in front) or a gerundive (from the verb ‘devoir’, to have to). Similarly, ‘maintenant’ can either be an adverb (now) or a gerundive (from the verb ‘maintenir’, to maintain). It should be clear now that ‘devant’ and ‘maintenant’ are both ambiguous with regard to their grammatical type. In English, depending on the relevant grammatical type, ‘devant’ is ambiguous between having to or in front). In the same way, ‘maintenant’ is ambiguous between now and maintening.
In order to disambiguate French words ‘devant’ or ‘maintenant’, rule-based MT needs a disambiguation module that is able to distinguish whether ‘devant’ or ‘maintenant’ are adverbs or gerundives.

(not to mention the fact that ‘devant’ can also be a preposition, for the sake of clarity).

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